Furry People like Gardens too!

One of the best things about creating a garden is being able to share what you produce with friends. Sometimes those friends are covered in fur (or feathers).

www.brighterfoundation.org

www.brighterfoundation.org

We rescue lots of animals in need of a forever home. Many of those animals benefit from our love of organic gardening, and they even help out in their own ways.

My little garden helpers listen well, only take what they need, and give back to the garden as much as they can. They instinctively follow the laws of nature. Boy, we could learn a lot from them.

It doesn’t really matter how much space you have. From growing wheatgrass indoors, to a big outdoor garden, you can create tons of food for you, your family, and your fur buddies.

In our wheatgrass post I showed you how quick and easy it is to grow wheatgrass to juice or to feed to animals.

I haven’t met an animal that didn’t like wheatgrass.

www.brighterfoundation.org

www.brighterfoundation.org

Humans, well that’s a bit different. It takes a little getting used to but it does wonders for the bod.

I like to grow many types of fruits and veggies together, not in rows but all mixed up. It helps you get to really know the plants and to be able to identify them in any situation and it looks beautiful, lush, and full. Planting flowers along with my fruits and veggies is another favorite thing to do and it is GOR-geous !

www.brighterfoundation.org

www.brighterfoundation.org

When planting for animals, and children, it’s important to know what can be harmful. I stay away from anything in the night shade family for me and the fur buddies.

www.brighterfoundation.org

www.brighterfoundation.org

Many people have allergic reactions to the night shade family so you may want to check before planting things like tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant and so on.

I like to stay with the dark green leafy veggies, and tons of herbs for all of us. Most animals do really well with the dark greens as long as you rotate them. Don’t feed rabbits kale, cabbage or other veggies everyday and always introduce new foods slowly.

This is why a garden for the fur kids is a great idea. They like to take a touch of this and a little of that and never gorge on one thing. Most of the time is spent running through the garden, peeking up, and laying down. Again, they eat like nature intended, for the most part, little bits, lots of variety, lots of moving around, and never too much of one thing.

www.brighterfoundation.org

www.brighterfoundation.org

I let the buns run in the garden for hours and believe it or not they don’t do the damage you hear about. They have a taste or two and then just chill. They leave their little poo balls around which is amazing fertilizer, and they dig little holes to sit in.

They are fantastic gardeners!

www.brighterfoundation.org

www.brighterfoundation.org

Now if you don’t want animals running around in the garden you eat from, no problem, just put your plants in another garden or containers and allow a patch for the animals.

www.brighterfoundation.org

www.brighterfoundation.org

Dogs, cats, rats (any meat eating animal) should not leave their droppings in your garden, that is not healthy or safe at all!

Herbivores like rabbits, cows, goats, and sheep are great fertilizer providers. Even chicken poo (they are not herbivores but ominvores) is great for fertilizer but I wouldn’t let them poo in the garden, its a bit messy, and is much better to compost it first.

Planting a garden of any size is stimulating, healthy, and fun for you and your animal buddies.

www.brighterfoundation.org

www.brighterfoundation.org

Try a tray of wheatgrass to start and enjoy giving your friends something you grew just for them.

Enjoy!

S

Panda bun thanking Brighter Future Foundation for the grub!

Panda bun thanking Brighter Future Foundation for the grub!

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